Jumble

This page is dedicated to Jumble Books and Publishers, my self-publishing service, which begins on 2 September 2021.

It will show the books Jumble publishes, including the poetry anthologies that will be created from public domain poems already featured on the site. Please click on the logo to find out more about Jumble Books and Publishers.

GALLERY OF BOOKS

Also available on Lulu.

Richard Greene has been writing poetry intensively since he retired from a 38-year career in international development in the mid-1990s. A lawyer by training, he fell into his development career by accident when, after law school, though planning not to practice law but interested in international affairs, he accepted an unsolicited job offer from the U.S. Agency for International Development. After a few years in Washington (or Foggy Bottom, as the location of the U.S. foreign policy establishment is known), he was assigned as legal advisor to the USAID mission in Laos and there discovered that the development business suited his interests and inclinations very well. Greene wrote poetry beginning in the 8th grade and continued through college where he studied with a Professor, Henry Rago, who later became editor of Poetry magazine, the leading U.S. poetry journal. However, he wrote few poems after law school as he became absorbed in international development, but turned back to poetry as he neared retirement.

Also available at Lulu (ebook only).

Richard Greene has been writing poetry intensively since he retired from a 38-year career in international development in the mid-1990s. A lawyer by training, he fell into his development career by accident when, after law school, though planning not to practice law but interested in international affairs, he accepted an unsolicited job offer from the U.S. Agency for International Development. After a few years in Washington (or Foggy Bottom, as the location of the U.S. foreign policy establishment is known), he was assigned as legal advisor to the USAID mission in Laos and there discovered that the development business suited his interests and inclinations very well.

Greene wrote poetry beginning in the 8th grade and continued through college where he studied with a Professor, Henry Rago, who later became editor of Poetry magazine, the leading U.S. poetry journal. However, he wrote few poems after law school as he became absorbed in international development, but turned back to poetry as he neared retirement.

 

Twenty easy microwave homemade treats to make in time for the holiday season.

Also available at Lulu.

 

A mondegreen is ‘a misunderstood or misinterpreted word or phrase resulting from a mishearing of the lyrics of a song’ (definition from Oxford Languages).

If you read old books, you have probably come across pieces of poetry that feel like mondegreens—they seem familiar and as if you should know them but somehow you can’t quite remember them. Mondegreen: Almost remembered poems is a small collection of such poems. All the poems are in the public domain and appeared on the blog, From Troubles of the World, between October 2011 and January 2012. To make searching for that elusive phrase easier, the print and PDF versions of the collection includes indices of first lines, titles and poets.

Also available at Lulu and Smashwords.

 

A collection of poems describing the exterior world, such as:

Orinocos of the Imagination

I’ve never been to the Orinoco
and have seen few photos of it,
but I feel I know its sinuous lengths,
winding between thick jungle walls,
flashing silver in the sun,
delicate waterfalls
threading from cloud-shrouded cliffs,
dense foliage
adorned with birds of kindergarten colors
and jaguars that merge into shadow,
the insistent music
of bird cry and monkey chatter,
dugouts and caimans
scoring its sleek waters,
those who people its valley
gliding nearly naked
through twilight forests,
dappled by the distant sun.
I know these lush landscapes
from my dreams.

Also available at Lulu.

Becoming Old by Richard Greene is a collection of poems on aging, such as:

I See Myself Becoming Old

My closet is full of suits I don’t wear anymore.
Nothing I need to wear them for.
There are days when I stay in my pajamas till noon.
I picture my heirs looking at my wardrobe one day
asking “Can you think of anyone who can use these
or should we give them to Goodwill?”
Or, “Would you like this tie as a remembrance of Dad?”
As I read the obits of the recently deceased,
which I took to doing a few years ago,
I compare their ages to mine.

Then there’s the arthritis in my hands and feet.
My left foot aches when I walk
and I suffered a rupture in a time-worn tendon not long ago.
I have more trouble lifting things and getting around.
Don’t jump over puddles anymore
for fear of the damage I might do coming down.
(No more kicking up heels for me.)

What will it be next,
the incipient cataracts?
My hearing isn’t what it used to be.
I don’t think I need a hearing aid yet,
though my daughter disagrees.
Or will it be something unforeseen
like that ill-fated tendon?

I see myself becoming old,
yet it’s as if I were watching it happen to somebody else.

Also available at Lulu.

The Broken Guitar by Richard Greene is a collection of poems about war:

Memorial

Reading the name
of a young man who died in war
saddens us.
Yet more the names of thousands
engraved in granite, or marble,
their parents’ hopes and dreams
interred in stone.
All that remains are a few keepsakes,
and memories
of newborns, toddlers, vulnerable boys,
youths becoming men,
those now sad memories,
and names carved in cold stone.

Who wanted those wars?
Their leaders of course,
but all too often those same young men,
and all too often
those who mourn for them.

Also available at Lulu.

Reader beware:  This book contains material that disparages cherished beliefs, opinions and institutions including political and religious ones.  While some readers may find that material refreshingly irreverent, others may find it offensive.  The aphorism quoted on the cover, “Patriotism, piety and chastity are all much overrated virtues”, offers a relatively mild example.  Some of the aphorisms offer potentially even more offensive material, so proceed with caution.

A few examples of Mr Greene’s aphorisms:

Sex wouldn’t be so nearly interesting if it weren’t so widely forbidden.

The truly strong are those who aren’t driven by the need to prove their strength.

Lawyers, actors and politicians must fool others. In the process they often fool themselves.

We tend to forget that not all mothers are saints, nor all soldiers heroes.

The most important measure of civilization is compassion, not technology, culture, sophisticated institutions, power or the gross national product.

Also available at Lulu.

%d bloggers like this: