Alone Am Y and Wille to be Alone by Charles of Orleans with rough rendering into almost modern English by flusteredduck

Alone am y and wille to be alone
— Alone, withouten plesere or gladnes
— Alone in care, to sighe and grone
— <Alone>, to wayle the deth of my maystres
— Alone, which sorow will me neuyr cesse.
Alone, y curse the lijf y do endure.
Alone this fayntith me my gret distres,
Alone y lyue, an ofcast creature.

Alone am y, most wofullest bigoon,
Alone, forlost in paynfull wildirnes,
Alone withouten whom to make my mone,
Alone, my wrecchid case forto redresse,
Alone thus wandir y in heuynes,
Alone, so wo worth myn aventure!
Alone to rage, this thynkith me swetnes,
Alone y lyue, an ofcast creature.

Alone! Deth, com take me here anoon,
Alone that dost me dure so moche distres!
Alone y lyue, my frendis alle and foon,
Alone to die thus in my lustynes.
Alone, most welcome Deth, do thi rudenes,
Alone, that worst kan pete, lo, mesure.
Alone come on; y bide but thee, dowtles.
Alone y lyue, an ofcast creature.

Alone of woo y haue take such excesse,
Alone, that phisik nys ther me to cure.
Alone y lyue, that willith it were lesse;
Alone y lyue, an ofcast creature.

Alone Am I and Will to be Alone by Charles of Orleans

Alone am I and will to be alone
— Alone, without pleasure or gladness
Alone in care, to sigh and groan
<Alone>, to wail the death of my mistress
Alone, which sorrow will for me never cease.
Alone, I curse the life I do endure.
Alone this wearieth me my great distress,
Alone I live, an offcast creature.

Alone am I, most woeful and woebegone,
Alone, completely lost in painful wilderness,
Alone, without anyone to hear my moan,
Alone, my wretched case without redress,
Alone thus wander I in heaviness,
Alone, so woeful mine adventure!
Alone to rage, this thinks me sweetness,
Alone I live, an offcast creature.

Alone! Death, come take me here anon,
Alone that does me endure so much distress!
Alone I live, my friends all and foes,
Alone to die thus in my lustiness.
Alone, most welcome Death, do thy rudeness,
Alone, that worst can pity, lo, measure.
Alone come on; I bid but thee, doubtless.
Alone I live, an offcast creature.

Alone of woe I have taken such excess,
Alone, that no physic there is can me cure,
Alone I live, that willeth it were less,
Alone I live, an offcast creature.

From: Arn, Mary-Jo (ed.) Fortunes Stabilnes: Charles of Orleans’s English Book of Love, 1994, Medieval & Renaissance Texts and Studies: Binghamton, New York, pp. 209-210.
(https://archive.org/stream/fortunesstabilne00charuoft#page/208/mode/2up)

Date: 1415-1440

By: Charles of Orleans (1394-1465)

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