The Induction from “Elizabetha Quasi Vivens, Eliza’s Funerall. A fewe Aprill Drops, showred on the Hearse of a dead Eliza. Or, The Funerall Tears of a true hearted Subject” by Henry Petowe

I that obscure have wept till eyes be drye,
Wilt each my pen another while to weep.
Obdurant hartes that they may mollifye,
For losse of her that now in peace doth sfleep.
Peace rest with her, but sorowe with my pen,
Till dead Eliza doth revive agen.

I that obscure have wept till eyes be drye,
Wilt each my pen another while to weep.
Obdurant hartes that they may mollifye,
For losse of her that now in peace doth sfleep.
Peace rest with her, but sorowe with my pen,
Till dead Eliza doth revive agen.

Amongst high sp’rited paragons of wit,
That mount beyond our earthlie pitch to fame,
Creepes forth my Muse; ye great ones favour it,
Take her not up, alas she is too tame.
Sheel come to hand, if you but lure her to you,
Then use her kindly, for shele kindly woe you.

And if this infant of mine art-lesse braine,
Passe with your sweet applause as some have done,
And meane good favour of the learned gaine
For showring teares upon Eliza’s tombe;
My Muse shall hatch such breed when she’s of yeres
Shall bring you comfort, and dry up your teares.

The last of many, yet not the least of all,
Sing I a heavie dirdge for our late Queene:
And singing, mourne Eliza’s Funerall,
The E per se of all that e’re have beene.
She was, she is, and evermore shall bee,
The blessed Queene of sweet eternitie.

With her in Heaven remaines her fame: on earth
Each moderne Poet that can make a verse
Writes of Eliza, even at their Muses birth.
Then why not I weepe on Eliza’s herse?
Som-where in England shall my lines go sleep
Till England read; and (England reading) weepe.

From: Nichols, John, The Progresses, and Public Processions, of Queen Elizabeth. Among which are interspersed , other Solemnities, Public Expenditures, and Remarkable Events, during the Reign of that illustrious Princess. Now first printed from Original MSS. of the Times; or collected from Scarce Pamphlets, etc., illustrated with historical notes. Volume II, 1788, John Nichols: London, p. 4 [p. 117].
(https://books.google.com.au/books?id=L1tfAAAAcAAJ)

Date: 1603

By: Henry Petowe (1575/6-?1636)

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