Returne The, Hairt by Alexander Scott (with rough translation into almost modern English by flusteredduck)

Returne the, hairt, hamewart agane,
And byd quhair thow was wont to be;
Thow art ana fule to suffer pane
For luve of hir þat luvis not the.
My hairt, lat be sic fantesie;
Luve nane bot as thay mak the causs;
And lat hir seik ane hairt for the,
For feind a crum of the scho fawis1.

To quhat effect sowld thow be thrall
But thāk, sen thow hes thy fre will?
My hairt, be not sa bestiall,
Bot knaw quho2 dois the guid or ill;
Remane with me and tary still,
And se quha playis best thair pawis3,
And lat fillok4 ga fling hir fill,
For feind a crum of the scho fawis.

Thocht scho be fair I will not fenʒie;
Scho is the kind of vþiris ma;
For quhy thair is a fellone mēʒie5
That semis gud, and ar not sa.
My hairt, tak nowdir pane nor wa
For Meg, for Meriory, or ʒit Mawis,
Bot be thow glaid and latt hir ga,
For feind a crum of the scho fawis.

Becaus I find scho tuik in ill,
At hir departing thow mak na cair;
Bot all begyld, go quhair scho6 will,
Be schrew the hairt that mane makis mair.
My hert, be mirry lait and air,
This is the fynall end and clauss,
And latt hir fallow ane filly7 fair.
For feind a crum of the scho fawis.

Finis q. Alexz Scott to his hert.

1 for not a crumb of thee to her falls
2 quh = wh
3 to play a part
4 giddy girl/jilt
5 great number
6 she/her
7 young dandy

Return Thee, Heart by Alexander Scott

Return thee, heart, homeward again,
And bide where thou was wont to be;
Thou art a fool to suffer pain
For love of her that loves not thee.
My heart, let be such fantasy;
Love none but as they make thee cause;
And let her seek another heart instead of thee.
For not a crumb of thee to her falls.

To what effect should thou be in thrall
But thankless, since thou has thy free will?
My heart, be not so witless,
But know who does thee good or ill;
Remain with me and tarry still,
And see who plays best their part,
And let the jilt go fling her fill,
For not a crumb of thee to her falls.

Though she be fair I will not fancy;
She is the kind that others may;
For where there is a great many
That seem good and art not so.
My heart, take neither pain nor woe
For Meg, for Marjory, or yet Mavis
But be thou glad and let her go,
For not a crumb of thee to her falls.

Because I find she took in ill.
At her departing thou make no care
But all beguiled, go where she will
Be shrew the heart that laments more.
My heart, be merry, light and air,
This is the final end and clause
And let her follow a young dandy fair
For not a crumb of thee to her falls.

Finish Alexander Scott to his heart.

From: Cranstoun, James (ed), The Poems of Alexander Scott, 1896, Blackwood and Sons: Edinburgh and London, pp. 66-67.
(http://archive.org/stream/poemsalexanders01scotgoog#page/n96/mode/2up)

Date: ?

By: Alexander Scott (?1520-1582/1583)

Translated by: flusteredduck

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